YogaOsteo

$19.99

Keywords : Bone Mineral Density, Muscle Metabolism, Immune, Nerve and Heart Health, Blood Sugar Support, Joint Health

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Description

Keywords: Bone Mineral Density, Muscle Metabolism, Immune, Nerve and Heart Health, Blood Sugar Support, Joint Health,

Calcium

Calcium is a substantial part of the intra cell communication and essential for several activities in the body, such as immune activation (1, 2), neuronal signaling (3-5), cell growth and maintenance (6, 7), insulin release and control of blood sugar (8, 9), among others. Calcium is essential for bone strength and healthy teeth. The bones and tooth contain about 99% of the entire calcium in the body (10). Calcium increases bone mineral density and reduces fracture (11-13). Inadequate calcium results in bone diseases (14, 15). Calcium is also important in the contraction and relaxation of blood vessels and muscles (16, 17). Additionally, adequate calcium levels are also important in muscle metabolism (16, 18, 19). Calcium is critical in the relaying of messages from the brain to other body parts and release of hormones (3, 5, 9). As we age, especially during menopause calcium and vitamin D absorption declines (20). About 50% of the US population; ~70% of older women take dietary calcium supplements (21) because of its widespread importance in the efficient functioning of the body’s physiology. Studies suggest that a combination of vitamin D and calcium intake bolsters improvement in bone mineral density (19, 22, 23).

Vitamin D

The skin synthesizes vitamin D when exposed to sunlight (10).There is wide variation in the amount the skin produces and as we age, it often does not synthesize enough (10). Vitamin D enhances calcium and phosphorous absorption in the gut (24, 25). Lack of vitamin D results in soft, as well as fragile bones. Vitamin D aids in the normal functioning of the immune system to mitigate against infection by viruses and bacteria (26). Vitamin D also has anti-inflammatory effect and aids in the modulation of the immune system (24). Inadequate Vitamin D is also associated with muscle weakness (27-29) and may facilitate joint diseases (30, 31). It is also important for nervous system function (32, 33). Vitamin D is an antioxidant and supports the structural integrity of the DNA (34). Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with low mood (35).

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting to prevent excessive bleeding. Studies found an association of vitamin K intake with improved insulin sensitivity (36, 37). Vitamin K improves bone strength and reduces heart disease risk (38, 39). Vitamin K also activates Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a protein in the walls of blood vessels and cartilages which prevents calcium from being deposited and clogging the blood vessels, and calcifying the soft tissues of the joints (40). Calcium is supposed to be deposited in the bones and tooth and not arterial blood vessels and soft tissues. When arterial blood vessels are clogged blood flow is restricted which can result in heart and peripheral vascular conditions (41).
TET METABOLIC’s YogaOsteo is formulated to help optimize the bone mineral density. The bone is an active metabolic tissue, supplying essential minerals for an overall healthy state.

References

1. Dadsetan S, Zakharova L, Molinski TF, Fomina AF. Store-operated Ca2+ influx causes Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ channels that is required for T cell activation. J Biol Chem. 2008;283(18):12512-9.

2. Shaw PJ, Feske S. Regulation of lymphocyte function by ORAI and STIM proteins in infection and autoimmunity. J Physiol. 2012;590(17):4157-67.

3. Kolarow R, Brigadski T, Lessmann V. Postsynaptic secretion of BDNF and NT-3 from hippocampal neurons depends on calcium calmodulin kinase II signaling and proceeds via delayed fusion pore opening. J Neurosci. 2007;27(39):10350-64.

4. Fitzjohn SM, Collingridge GL. Calcium stores and synaptic plasticity. Cell Calcium. 2002;32(5-6):405-11.

5. Tabuchi A. Synaptic plasticity-regulated gene expression: a key event in the long-lasting changes of neuronal function. Biol Pharm Bull. 2008;31(3):327-35.

6. Berridge MJ, Bootman MD, Lipp P. Calcium–a life and death signal. Nature. 1998;395(6703):645-8.

7. Limbrick DD, Jr., Sombati S, DeLorenzo RJ. Calcium influx constitutes the ionic basis for the maintenance of glutamate-induced extended neuronal depolarization associated with hippocampal neuronal death. Cell Calcium. 2003;33(2):69-81.

8. Imoto H, Sasaki N, Iwase M, Nakamura U, Oku M, Sonoki K, et al. Impaired insulin secretion by diphenyleneiodium associated with perturbation of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic beta-cells. Endocrinology. 2008;149(11):5391-400.

9. Misler S, Barnett DW, Pressel DM, Gillis KD, Scharp DW, Falke LC. Stimulus-secretion coupling in beta-cells of transplantable human islets of Langerhans. Evidence for a critical role for Ca2+ entry. Diabetes. 1992;41(6):662-70.

10. In: Ross AC, Taylor CL, Yaktine AL, Del Valle HB, editors. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. The National Academies Collection: Reports funded by National Institutes of Health. Washington (DC)2011.

11. Jackson RD, LaCroix AZ, Gass M, Wallace RB, Robbins J, Lewis CE, et al. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and the risk of fractures. N Engl J Med. 2006;354(7):669-83.

12. Zhang ZQ, Ma XM, Huang ZW, Yang XG, Chen YM, Su YX. Effects of milk salt supplementation on bone mineral gain in pubertal Chinese adolescents: a 2-year randomized, double-blind, controlled, dose-response trial. Bone. 2014;65:69-76.

13. Kalkwarf HJ, Khoury JC, Lanphear BP. Milk intake during childhood and adolescence, adult bone density, and osteoporotic fractures in US women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(1):257-65.

14. Stracke H, Renner E, Knie G, Leidig G, Minne H, Federlin K. Osteoporosis and bone metabolic parameters in dependence upon calcium intake through milk and milk products. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993;47(9):617-22.

15. Renner E. Dairy calcium, bone metabolism, and prevention of osteoporosis. J Dairy Sci. 1994;77(12):3498-505.

16. Gehlert S, Bloch W, Suhr F. Ca2+-dependent regulations and signaling in skeletal muscle: from electro-mechanical coupling to adaptation. Int J Mol Sci. 2015;16(1):1066-95.

17. Schepelmann M, Yarova PL, Lopez-Fernandez I, Davies TS, Brennan SC, Edwards PJ, et al. The vascular Ca2+-sensing receptor regulates blood vessel tone and blood pressure. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2016;310(3):C193-204.

18. Kuo IY, Ehrlich BE. Signaling in muscle contraction. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2015;7(2):a006023.

19. Chiodini I, Bolland MJ. Calcium supplementation in osteoporosis: useful or harmful? European journal of endocrinology. 2018;178(4):D13-D25.

20. Aloia JF, Chen DG, Yeh JK, Chen H. Serum vitamin D metabolites and intestinal calcium absorption efficiency in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;92(4):835-40.

21. Bailey RL, Dodd KW, Goldman JA, Gahche JJ, Dwyer JT, Moshfegh AJ, et al. Estimation of total usual calcium and vitamin D intakes in the United States. J Nutr. 2010;140(4):817-22.

22. Shea MK, O’Donnell CJ, Hoffmann U, Dallal GE, Dawson-Hughes B, Ordovas JM, et al. Vitamin K supplementation and progression of coronary artery calcium in older men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(6):1799-807.

23. Knapen MH, Drummen NE, Smit E, Vermeer C, Theuwissen E. Three-year low-dose menaquinone-7 supplementation helps decrease bone loss in healthy postmenopausal women. Osteoporos Int. 2013;24(9):2499-507.

24. Jones G, Strugnell SA, DeLuca HF. Current understanding of the molecular actions of vitamin D. Physiol Rev. 1998;78(4):1193-231.

25. DeLuca HF. The vitamin D story: a collaborative effort of basic science and clinical medicine. FASEB J. 1988;2(3):224-36.

26. Adams JS, Hewison M. Unexpected actions of vitamin D: new perspectives on the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2008;4(2):80-90.

27. Rejnmark L. Effects of vitamin d on muscle function and performance: a review of evidence from randomized controlled trials. Ther Adv Chronic Dis. 2011;2(1):25-37.

28. Inderjeeth CA, Glennon D, Petta A, Soderstrom J, Boyatzis I, Tapper J. Vitamin D and muscle strength in patients with previous fractures. N Z Med J. 2007;120(1262):U2730.

29. Foo LH, Zhang Q, Zhu K, Ma G, Hu X, Greenfield H, et al. Low vitamin D status has an adverse influence on bone mass, bone turnover, and muscle strength in Chinese adolescent girls. J Nutr. 2009;139(5):1002-7.

30. Garfinkel RJ, Dilisio MF, Agrawal DK. Vitamin D and Its Effects on Articular Cartilage and Osteoarthritis. Orthop J Sports Med. 2017;5(6):2325967117711376.

31. Li S, Niu G, Wu Y, Du G, Huang C, Yin X, et al. Vitamin D prevents articular cartilage erosion by regulating collagen II turnover through TGF-beta1 in ovariectomized rats. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2016;24(2):345-53.

32. Wrzosek M, Lukaszkiewicz J, Wrzosek M, Jakubczyk A, Matsumoto H, Piatkiewicz P, et al. Vitamin D and the central nervous system. Pharmacol Rep. 2013;65(2):271-8.

33. Annweiler C, Schott AM, Berrut G, Chauvire V, Le Gall D, Inzitari M, et al. Vitamin D and ageing: neurological issues. Neuropsychobiology. 2010;62(3):139-50.

34. Halicka HD, Zhao H, Li J, Traganos F, Studzinski GP, Darzynkiewicz Z. Attenuation of constitutive DNA damage signaling by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Aging (Albany NY). 2012;4(4):270-8.

35. Wilkins CH, Sheline YI, Roe CM, Birge SJ, Morris JC. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with low mood and worse cognitive performance in older adults. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006;14(12):1032-40.

36. Choi HJ, Yu J, Choi H, An JH, Kim SW, Park KS, et al. Vitamin K2 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity via osteocalcin metabolism: a placebo-controlled trial. Diabetes Care. 2011;34(9):e147.

37. Sakamoto N, Nishiike T, Iguchi H, Sakamoto K. Possible effects of one week vitamin K (menaquinone-4) tablets intake on glucose tolerance in healthy young male volunteers with different descarboxy prothrombin levels. Clin Nutr. 2000;19(4):259-63.

38. Erkkila AT, Booth SL, Hu FB, Jacques PF, Lichtenstein AH. Phylloquinone intake and risk of cardiovascular diseases in men. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007;17(1):58-62.

39. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to vitamin K and maintenance of bone (ID 123, 127, 128, and 2879), blood coagulation (ID 124 and 126), and function of the heart and blood vessels (ID 124, 125 and 2880) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. EFSA Journal. 2009;7(10):1228.

40. Akbari S, Rasouli-Ghahroudi AA. Vitamin K and Bone Metabolism: A Review of the Latest Evidence in Preclinical Studies. Biomed Res Int. 2018;2018:4629383.

41. Sigvant B, Hasvold P, Kragsterman B, Falkenberg M, Johansson S, Thuresson M, et al. Cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease as an initial or subsequent manifestation of atherosclerotic disease: Results from a Swedish nationwide study. J Vasc Surg. 2017;66(2):507-14 e1.

Product Information

Keywords: Bone Mineral Density, Muscle Metabolism, Immune, Nerve and Heart Health, Blood Sugar Support, Joint Health,

Supplement Fact

Product Literature

Calcium
Calcium is a substantial part of the intra cell communication and essential for several activities in the body, such as immune activation (1, 2), neuronal signaling (3-5), cell growth and maintenance (6, 7), insulin release and control of blood sugar (8, 9), among others. Calcium is essential for bone strength and healthy teeth. The bones and tooth contain about 99% of the entire calcium in the body (10). Calcium increases bone mineral density and reduces fracture (11-13). Inadequate calcium results in bone diseases (14, 15). Calcium is also important in the contraction and relaxation of blood vessels and muscles (16, 17). Additionally, adequate calcium levels are also important in muscle metabolism (16, 18, 19). Calcium is critical in the relaying of messages from the brain to other body parts and release of hormones (3, 5, 9). As we age, especially during menopause calcium and vitamin D absorption declines (20). About 50% of the US population; ~70% of older women take dietary calcium supplements (21) because of its widespread importance in the efficient functioning of the body’s physiology. Studies suggest that a combination of vitamin D and calcium intake bolsters improvement in bone mineral density (19, 22, 23).

Vitamin D
The skin synthesizes vitamin D when exposed to sunlight (10).There is wide variation in the amount the skin produces and as we age, it often does not synthesize enough (10). Vitamin D enhances calcium and phosphorous absorption in the gut (24, 25). Lack of vitamin D results in soft, as well as fragile bones. Vitamin D aids in the normal functioning of the immune system to mitigate against infection by viruses and bacteria (26). Vitamin D also has anti-inflammatory effect and aids in the modulation of the immune system (24). Inadequate Vitamin D is also associated with muscle weakness (27-29) and may facilitate joint diseases (30, 31). It is also important for nervous system function (32, 33). Vitamin D is an antioxidant and supports the structural integrity of the DNA (34). Vitamin D deficiency is also associated with low mood (35).

Vitamin K
Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting to prevent excessive bleeding. Studies found an association of vitamin K intake with improved insulin sensitivity (36, 37). Vitamin K improves bone strength and reduces heart disease risk (38, 39). Vitamin K also activates Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a protein in the walls of blood vessels and cartilages which prevents calcium from being deposited and clogging the blood vessels, and calcifying the soft tissues of the joints (40). Calcium is supposed to be deposited in the bones and tooth and not arterial blood vessels and soft tissues. When arterial blood vessels are clogged blood flow is restricted which can result in heart and peripheral vascular conditions (41).
TET METABOLIC’s YogaOsteo is formulated to help optimize the bone mineral density. The bone is an active metabolic tissue, supplying essential minerals for an overall healthy state.

References
1. Dadsetan S, Zakharova L, Molinski TF, Fomina AF. Store-operated Ca2+ influx causes Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ channels that is required for T cell activation. J Biol Chem. 2008;283(18):12512-9.

2. Shaw PJ, Feske S. Regulation of lymphocyte function by ORAI and STIM proteins in infection and autoimmunity. J Physiol. 2012;590(17):4157-67.

3. Kolarow R, Brigadski T, Lessmann V. Postsynaptic secretion of BDNF and NT-3 from hippocampal neurons depends on calcium calmodulin kinase II signaling and proceeds via delayed fusion pore opening. J Neurosci. 2007;27(39):10350-64.

4. Fitzjohn SM, Collingridge GL. Calcium stores and synaptic plasticity. Cell Calcium. 2002;32(5-6):405-11.

5. Tabuchi A. Synaptic plasticity-regulated gene expression: a key event in the long-lasting changes of neuronal function. Biol Pharm Bull. 2008;31(3):327-35.

6. Berridge MJ, Bootman MD, Lipp P. Calcium–a life and death signal. Nature. 1998;395(6703):645-8.

7. Limbrick DD, Jr., Sombati S, DeLorenzo RJ. Calcium influx constitutes the ionic basis for the maintenance of glutamate-induced extended neuronal depolarization associated with hippocampal neuronal death. Cell Calcium. 2003;33(2):69-81.

8. Imoto H, Sasaki N, Iwase M, Nakamura U, Oku M, Sonoki K, et al. Impaired insulin secretion by diphenyleneiodium associated with perturbation of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic beta-cells. Endocrinology. 2008;149(11):5391-400.

9. Misler S, Barnett DW, Pressel DM, Gillis KD, Scharp DW, Falke LC. Stimulus-secretion coupling in beta-cells of transplantable human islets of Langerhans. Evidence for a critical role for Ca2+ entry. Diabetes. 1992;41(6):662-70.

10. In: Ross AC, Taylor CL, Yaktine AL, Del Valle HB, editors. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. The National Academies Collection: Reports funded by National Institutes of Health. Washington (DC)2011.

11. Jackson RD, LaCroix AZ, Gass M, Wallace RB, Robbins J, Lewis CE, et al. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and the risk of fractures. N Engl J Med. 2006;354(7):669-83.

12. Zhang ZQ, Ma XM, Huang ZW, Yang XG, Chen YM, Su YX. Effects of milk salt supplementation on bone mineral gain in pubertal Chinese adolescents: a 2-year randomized, double-blind, controlled, dose-response trial. Bone. 2014;65:69-76.

13. Kalkwarf HJ, Khoury JC, Lanphear BP. Milk intake during childhood and adolescence, adult bone density, and osteoporotic fractures in US women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(1):257-65.

14. Stracke H, Renner E, Knie G, Leidig G, Minne H, Federlin K. Osteoporosis and bone metabolic parameters in dependence upon calcium intake through milk and milk products. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993;47(9):617-22.

15. Renner E. Dairy calcium, bone metabolism, and prevention of osteoporosis. J Dairy Sci. 1994;77(12):3498-505.

16. Gehlert S, Bloch W, Suhr F. Ca2+-dependent regulations and signaling in skeletal muscle: from electro-mechanical coupling to adaptation. Int J Mol Sci. 2015;16(1):1066-95.

17. Schepelmann M, Yarova PL, Lopez-Fernandez I, Davies TS, Brennan SC, Edwards PJ, et al. The vascular Ca2+-sensing receptor regulates blood vessel tone and blood pressure. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2016;310(3):C193-204.

18. Kuo IY, Ehrlich BE. Signaling in muscle contraction. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2015;7(2):a006023.

19. Chiodini I, Bolland MJ. Calcium supplementation in osteoporosis: useful or harmful? European journal of endocrinology. 2018;178(4):D13-D25.

20. Aloia JF, Chen DG, Yeh JK, Chen H. Serum vitamin D metabolites and intestinal calcium absorption efficiency in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;92(4):835-40.

21. Bailey RL, Dodd KW, Goldman JA, Gahche JJ, Dwyer JT, Moshfegh AJ, et al. Estimation of total usual calcium and vitamin D intakes in the United States. J Nutr. 2010;140(4):817-22.

22. Shea MK, O’Donnell CJ, Hoffmann U, Dallal GE, Dawson-Hughes B, Ordovas JM, et al. Vitamin K supplementation and progression of coronary artery calcium in older men and women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(6):1799-807.

23. Knapen MH, Drummen NE, Smit E, Vermeer C, Theuwissen E. Three-year low-dose menaquinone-7 supplementation helps decrease bone loss in healthy postmenopausal women. Osteoporos Int. 2013;24(9):2499-507.

24. Jones G, Strugnell SA, DeLuca HF. Current understanding of the molecular actions of vitamin D. Physiol Rev. 1998;78(4):1193-231.

25. DeLuca HF. The vitamin D story: a collaborative effort of basic science and clinical medicine. FASEB J. 1988;2(3):224-36.

26. Adams JS, Hewison M. Unexpected actions of vitamin D: new perspectives on the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2008;4(2):80-90.

27. Rejnmark L. Effects of vitamin d on muscle function and performance: a review of evidence from randomized controlled trials. Ther Adv Chronic Dis. 2011;2(1):25-37.

28. Inderjeeth CA, Glennon D, Petta A, Soderstrom J, Boyatzis I, Tapper J. Vitamin D and muscle strength in patients with previous fractures. N Z Med J. 2007;120(1262):U2730.

29. Foo LH, Zhang Q, Zhu K, Ma G, Hu X, Greenfield H, et al. Low vitamin D status has an adverse influence on bone mass, bone turnover, and muscle strength in Chinese adolescent girls. J Nutr. 2009;139(5):1002-7.

30. Garfinkel RJ, Dilisio MF, Agrawal DK. Vitamin D and Its Effects on Articular Cartilage and Osteoarthritis. Orthop J Sports Med. 2017;5(6):2325967117711376.

31. Li S, Niu G, Wu Y, Du G, Huang C, Yin X, et al. Vitamin D prevents articular cartilage erosion by regulating collagen II turnover through TGF-beta1 in ovariectomized rats. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2016;24(2):345-53.

32. Wrzosek M, Lukaszkiewicz J, Wrzosek M, Jakubczyk A, Matsumoto H, Piatkiewicz P, et al. Vitamin D and the central nervous system. Pharmacol Rep. 2013;65(2):271-8.

33. Annweiler C, Schott AM, Berrut G, Chauvire V, Le Gall D, Inzitari M, et al. Vitamin D and ageing: neurological issues. Neuropsychobiology. 2010;62(3):139-50.

34. Halicka HD, Zhao H, Li J, Traganos F, Studzinski GP, Darzynkiewicz Z. Attenuation of constitutive DNA damage signaling by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Aging (Albany NY). 2012;4(4):270-8.

35. Wilkins CH, Sheline YI, Roe CM, Birge SJ, Morris JC. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with low mood and worse cognitive performance in older adults. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006;14(12):1032-40.

36. Choi HJ, Yu J, Choi H, An JH, Kim SW, Park KS, et al. Vitamin K2 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity via osteocalcin metabolism: a placebo-controlled trial. Diabetes Care. 2011;34(9):e147.

37. Sakamoto N, Nishiike T, Iguchi H, Sakamoto K. Possible effects of one week vitamin K (menaquinone-4) tablets intake on glucose tolerance in healthy young male volunteers with different descarboxy prothrombin levels. Clin Nutr. 2000;19(4):259-63.

38. Erkkila AT, Booth SL, Hu FB, Jacques PF, Lichtenstein AH. Phylloquinone intake and risk of cardiovascular diseases in men. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007;17(1):58-62.

39. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to vitamin K and maintenance of bone (ID 123, 127, 128, and 2879), blood coagulation (ID 124 and 126), and function of the heart and blood vessels (ID 124, 125 and 2880) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. EFSA Journal. 2009;7(10):1228.

40. Akbari S, Rasouli-Ghahroudi AA. Vitamin K and Bone Metabolism: A Review of the Latest Evidence in Preclinical Studies. Biomed Res Int. 2018;2018:4629383.

41. Sigvant B, Hasvold P, Kragsterman B, Falkenberg M, Johansson S, Thuresson M, et al. Cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease as an initial or subsequent manifestation of atherosclerotic disease: Results from a Swedish nationwide study. J Vasc Surg. 2017;66(2):507-14 e1.

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